What is QuickTime, anyhow?

Inspired by a video by Mike Seymour at fxPhd on cool Quicktime tricks, I want to say something very simple: QuickTime is not a format. If you’ve ever heard someone say something like, “no, we need the uncompressed files, not the QuickTimes,” that person is repeating a common misapprehension, which is that QuickTime by its nature somehow reduces image quality.

QuickTime doesn’t kill image quality, people with bad settings kill image quality (although as I mentioned earlier, QuickTime can certainly help by making gamma settings unpredictable).

Here’s an excerpt from the book:

While still formats tend to offer a particular encoding option as part of the format itself, QuickTime is simply a container file that can hold arbitrary tracks of video, audio, still files, and more. Any of these tracks can have unique compression, frame rate, encoding, and bit depth. Sometimes, a given video or audio format is not available on a different machine or platform, even when it doesn’t involve compression making QuickTime less universal than would be ideal.

Other moving image formats that seem to be related to QuickTime, such as .MP4 and .M4V, are more like sub-sets of it; they can play back without QuickTime Player installed, but they offer a more limited range of encoding and compression.

Even if you all of the above, you may not realize all you can do to manipulate an .mov file in QuickTime Pro. Think of an .mov file as a bucket of data, and you’re ready to start taking things in and out of the bucket, tweaking them along the way. More to come.

6 November 2007 | training | Comments

Comments are closed.

Navigation

Archives

Meta

December 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

google

google

asus